Medical insurance billing software and EHR software has been in the limelight the past few years. It started with the proposal by President Obama’s stimulus plan to foot the bill for doctor’s offices to use EMR (electronic medical records) software. This software would include insurance billing software.

The long awaited software program had been the subject of much controversy.  But one this for certain, some aspects can be a timesaver.  This is innovative software developed for healthcare professionals as well as billing services employed by the medical profession.Using electronic claims for billing allows the least amount of mistakes, saves valuable office time if you use electronic statements and the rapid verification of eligibility for certain procedures. The time of approval is cut to a minimum and the documentation of the verification is on your computer.

Accounting becomes a snap when using medical insurance billing software. The software keeps track of what has been paid and what is still owed. The patient ledger will show you which patient’s insurance company has made a payment, how it was made and if there are adjustments needed to the account.

If you need a certain patient’s file on the screen, it is there. The time it took to hunt through file cabinets and fill out new patient billing information to add to a folder that was already too thick took up precious time. Now the information can be put into the computer, entered and it is at your fingertips when you need to find something.

When it comes to multi-tasking, medical insurance billing software will allow you to do several jobs at the same time. When you have entered the information in the billing section and prompted it to start, you can go on and do other tasks while this is in the process.

Making Office Time a Little Shorter With Medisoft Version 20

Everyone knows the majority of time you spend in an office is doing paperwork. If you could eliminate a major portion of this paperwork the time can be spent with patients. This includes time you spend on the telephone with insurance companies. Tracking down payments and charges by using medical insurance billing software will allow you more free time to get to the really important things.  With Version 20 of Medisoft, you can reduce the paper handling and shuffling by letting your patients fill in their demographic information on a tablet computer, then when they finish, your front office staff can verify the info, and with a click of a button, transfer that information to Medisoft, saving your staff the time consuming task of typing the  information into the Medisoft program themselves.  Not only that, the forms that patients sign off on , like HIPAA and other forms can be included on the tablet for approval from the patient, saving them time signing, and allows you to store the information digitally in Medisoft.Download a copy of Medisoft Medical Billing by clicking on this link.

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Here’s a good article to get you going…

 

http://www.physicianspractice.com/icd-10/creating-icd-10-action-plan-possible-effects-and-office-awareness

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On October 1, 2014, ICD-9 will be replaced with ICD-10. This will fundamentally change your revenue cycle and all departments in your organization. Do you have a tactical plan for the next 11 months?

 

Register for this free webinar here:

http://www.bridgefront.com/webinars/2013.10.23_icd10/information.php

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Learn from those who have been testing already…

Here is an excerpt:

Average accuracy of the coders involved in the program was 63 percent, with some instances of 100 percent accuracy (e.g., “single live born,  born in the hospital, delivered by Caesarean section”); others (e.g., “pain of the limb”) received a 33 percent accuracy score because specificity and laterality were not included.

Among the recommendations the report makes for healthcare organizations implementing ICD-10 testing programs are:

* Find a testing solution that is reusable and repeatable; avoid one-time-only solutions,

* Move away from silo based testing software and approaches that inhibit collaboration across the healthcare continuum because as an industry unfunded mandates require high level cost containment strategies,

* Assign all codes from a native ICD-10 perspective rather than converting from ICD-9 to ICD-10:

Learn more here:

http://www.healthdatamanagement.com/news/recommendations-himss-wedi-icd-10-pilot-program-46870-1.html

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As you prepare for your transition to the new ICD-10 diagnosis codes, you will need to work closely with different partners.  In today’s blog post, we are going to look at the role of working with your clearinghouse and how they can help you prepare for the new diagnosis code implementation.  At the bottom of the blog post are some questions you should ask your clearinghouse.

Planning for ICD-10: Working with Clearinghouses


As we move towards the ICD-10 transition, CMS reminds practices that clearinghouses can be a valuable resource for testing ICD-10 preparedness. For instance, clearinghouses can help providers look at the reasons for rejection and analyze their claim problems during the transition. However, providers should not expect clearinghouses to offer the same level of assistance for ICD-10 transition as they did when HIPAA Version 5010 was implemented, since ICD-10 is based on provider data and clinical documentation.

The Role of Clearinghouses in the ICD-10 Transition
Practices preparing for the October 1, 2014, ICD-10 deadline are looking for resources and organizations that can help them make a smooth transition. It is important to know that while clearinghouses can help, they cannot provide the same level of support for the ICD-10 transition as they did for the Version 5010 upgrade. ICD-10 describes a medical diagnosis or hospital inpatient procedure and must be selected by the provider or a resource designated by the provider as their coder, and is based on clinical documentation.

During the change from Version 4010 to Version 5010, clearinghouses provided support to many providers by converting claims from Version 4010 to Version 5010 format. For ICD-10, clearinghouses can help by:

  • Identifying problems that lead to claims being rejected
  • Providing guidance about how to fix a rejected claim (e.g., the provider needs to include more or different data)

Clearinghouses cannot, however, help you identify which ICD-10 codes to use unless they offer coding services. Because ICD-10 codes are more specific, and one ICD-9 code may have several corresponding ICD-10 codes, selecting the appropriate ICD-10 code requires medical knowledge and familiarity with the specific clinical event.

While some clearinghouses may offer third-party billing/coding services, many do not. And even third-party billers cannot translate ICD-9 to ICD-10 codes unless they also have the detailed clinical documentation required to select the correct ICD-10 code.

As you reach out to your clearinghouse or billing service, you may want to ask:

  • Are you prepared to meet the ICD-10 deadline of October 1, 2014? Where is your organization in the transition process?
  • Can you verify that you have updated your system to Version 5010 standards for electronic transactions? (Only systems with Version 5010 can accept ICD-10 codes; systems with the older, Version 4010 standards cannot accommodate ICD-10.)
  • Who will be my primary contact at your organization for the ICD-10 transition?
  • Can we set up regular check-in meetings to keep progress on track?
  • What are your plans for testing claims containing ICD-10 codes? How will you involve your clients, such as my practice, in that process?
  • Can my practice send testclaims with ICD-10 codes to see if they are accepted? If so, when will you begin accepting test claims?
  • Can you provide guidance or training on how my clinical documentation will have to change to support ICD-10 coding?
  • Do you anticipate any pricing changes for your services due to the switch to ICD-10?

As you prepare for the October 1, 2014, ICD-10 deadline, clearinghouses are a good resource for testing that your ICD-10 claims can be processed—and for identifying and helping to remedy any problems with your test ICD-10 claims.

Keep Up to Date on ICD-10:
Visit the CMS ICD-10 website for the latest news and resources to help you prepare for the October 1, 2014, deadline.

Article Resource:
The Role of Clearinghouses in the ICD-10 Transition” located on the CMS website.
Planning for ICD-10: Working with Clearinghouses and Billing Services” located on the CMS website.

For more resources or information on Medisoft ICD-10 readiness, please visit www.medicalbillingsoftware.com/medisoft-icd-10.htm

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